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Prove Me Wrong
09-21-2013, 08:34 AM
Post: #21
RE: Prove Me Wrong
Steins;Gate won with 4 votes. I'll be back in a week or so to tell you whether or not it sucked.

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Twitter: Truthordeal

"Every man's heart one day beats its final beat, his lungs breath their final breath. And if what that man did in his life, makes the blood pulse through the body of others, and makes them believe deeper in something larger than life, then his essence, his spirit, will be immortalized by the storytellers, by the loyalty, by the memory, of those who honor him and make whatever the man did live forever."
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09-21-2013, 09:01 PM
Post: #22
RE: Prove Me Wrong
(09-21-2013 08:34 AM)Truthordeal Wrote:  I'll be back in a week or so to tell you whether or not it sucked.

I'll be expecting a 2 page review.

:3

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09-22-2013, 12:10 AM
Post: #23
RE: Prove Me Wrong
Be sure to watch the OVA. Pretty crucial I think. I haven't seen the movie because the dub isn't out yet.

(02-18-2012 12:30 PM)Airrest Wrote:  There's a certain charm to it that I don't think most people, even on this forum, are going to get or like.
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10-13-2013, 10:43 AM
Post: #24
RE: Prove Me Wrong
Yesterday, I finally finished Steins;Gate. Considering it's been almost a month since I made this challenge, I decided not to waste too much time in getting this review up.

Here are a couple things to keep in mind about my viewing experience. 1) I watched it dubbed. The first 12 episodes I watched on Funimation's Youtube channel, while the second half I had to watch on a 3rd party website because Funimation did not have the dub of those episodes up. 2) I watched all 24 episodes, the OVA and gigguk's review of the series. I felt like getting an outsider's perspective, especially from someone who is an anime fan but has standards, would help me figure out a context for this review. 3) 4chan spoiled the ending for me. If you've watched up to the ending, the ending shouldn't surprise you too much, but I'm pointing that out.

Now I've written two reviews. The first is a short "did I like it or not" version so that everyone can read it and go home happy. The second is the "2 page" one that Replay facetiously challenged me to. I'm basing it on a style used by a reviewer I really enjoyed. I might link to his reviews of the Final Fantasy games if there's interest.

First off, I'll give you the tl;dr version.

Steins;Gate is great. Phenomenal, even; it has definitely earned a rank in my top 10 favorite animated shows of all time. More importantly, it is a good SHOW, not just a good anime. It has shown that a great story can be conveyed through the often lackluster visual style of anime. It's still an utter shame that people instead choose to watch fucking school girl shit.

Of all of the parts that go into making a show, the one that deserves a special acclaim in this review is the dubbing. Steins;Gate has become the golden standard for me when it comes to anime dubs. Cowboy Bebop may have set the bar high over a decade ago with Steven Blum's smooth portrayal of Spike Spiegel, but as of 2012, J Michael Tatum has wrenched that accolade away with his over the top rendition of Rintaro Okabe. Furthermore, Funimation made some very bold but necessary changes to the script to make it more relevant for their dub audience. Steins;Gate may have taken place in Akihabara, but the characters feel "real" and personal, even to westerners.

So that's my short review. I'll put the longer one behind spoilers.

Spoiler(Show)

The Plot

With the exception of sports and game shows, a good "show" is made or broken by its story. You watch television to be entertained, and the prime form of entertainment is by telling a story. This has been the case since print was invented, and even before that to when humans first uttered gutteral sounds necessary to communicate with other humans. So what is the story behind Steins;Gate?

In July, 2010, a self-proclaimed mad scientist Rintaro Okabe discovers the dead body of Makise Kurisu, a genius female scientist, while attending a lecture on time travel with his friend Mayuri. After sending an email to his friend Daru, he is suddenly hit by a sensation, after which he is in a different place in Akihabara, on the same day. It turns out that the email he sent was sent to his friend a week in the past, which altered the timeline enough to prevent Kurisu's death. With the help of the now living Kurisu, Okabe and his ragtag "laboratory" of friends discover how to send emails back in time using an ordinary microwave. They use this newfound power to try to win the lottery, change the sex of one of their members, and save the father of another member from dying in an accident. Along the way they cross paths with the scientific organization SERN (aka CERN in real life) who finds out about their time travelling projects. As they develop a machine that will send a person's memories back in time, effectively time travelling, SERN raids their headquarters and kills Mayuri, leading Okabe to time travel and prevent it all from happening.

And THAT'S where the action really kicks in. The rest of the anime is spent trying to undo all of the mistakes Okabe made in order to save Mayuri and spring to a "worldline" where a cataclysmic future controlled by SERN is prevented. All in all the story starts out fairly slow and lighthearted. By the second act, however, everything is turned on its head and the story becomes really heavy. So many plot twists and developments happen so rapidly that trying to summarize them all cannot do it justice. And that is something you can very rarely say about an anime.

The plot of Steins;Gate is amazing in execution. The story gets extremely complex, and it takes the entire season to unravel everything; you won't be able to predict how it ends by the end of the first act. Since a story has no suspense if you know everything turns out alright, this is a coup. More importantly, it means that understanding the story requires you to pay attention. You cannot turn your brain off and enjoy it. Which leads me to another point: for a sci-fi show, there is very little bullshit. By this I mean that all of the science and world building stays consistent, and since you must pay attention to the plot, you will not end up being put off by any glaring continuity errors or plotholes.

More than a couple of times in the past when I've been critical about an anime, fans have asked me why I can't just enjoy something and not think too hard about it. Those fans are morons. If a show draws attention to flaws in its own story that are impossible to overlook without turning off your brain, then that show probably sucks. Abridged series do this, anime does this, and sure, a lot of other shows in various media do this. You know an example of a good movie? Die Hard. It is nothing but explosions and action while Bruce Willis takes on the bad guy terrorists. But at no point in Die Hard are you questioning how Bruce Willis did something, or why he acts a certain way. The directors of Die Hard did the very basic duty that a writer must do and that is not make your story so obviously flawed that it ruins the immersion of your viewer.

Most anime don't do that, but Steins;Gate does. If Steins;Gate were like Die Hard, a popcorn story where you don't have to think too much, this wouldn't be an accomplishment. But you have to have some mental acuity to follow everything and get everything from the story that you need to enjoy it, and that's amazing. I bring this up to show that Steins;Gate is not just good on the grounds that it's better than most anime; it's good because its story is good.

Characters

A piece of storytelling that those here at Abridged Forums are no doubt tired of hearing about is that characters are essential. A blank slate is just wish fulfillment, and a blank slate thrown into an interesting story will make the story feel bland. If you have no attachment to the people involved in the plot, you won't feel bad when the plot screws them over, or feel good when they finally win. In order for that attachment to happen though, your characters must feel real, be interesting, and, if they're good guys, likeable.

In gigguk's review of Steins;Gate he made the observation that all of the characters except Okabe were static and more or less just derivatives of popular anime stock characters. I feel like, if that is the case, we were watching two different shows. And in fact, since I watched this dubbed while he watched it in the original Nihongers, that is actually very possible.

Either way, I'll focus on the guy we both agree is awesome: the protagonist, Rintaro Okabe. From the very first scene Okabe is in, at the very beginning of the show, you the viewer are entranced by him. He seems to be a superficial megalomaniac, only concerned with his imaginary laboratory and his delusions of an "organization" that is out to get him. He seems like a conspiracy nut, and considering that he lives in a run-down apartment above a TV shop, you can't imagine he's a very successful one. And yet...Okabe is utterly likeable. You never wonder how a person without much wealth or fame managed to gather such a diverse group of friends around him. Okabe's laboratory grows throughout the series because of the power of his personality. Compare this to every slice of life anime protagonist, who, by the end of the series, has an entire harem of women that want him because he's bishounen and does nice things for people. The writers did an amazing job of creating such a charismatic and likeable figure. Considering that almost every scene in Steins;Gate revolves around Okabe's perspective, creating such an enamouring character was essential for the audience to get behind the entire story.

Throughout the first twelve episodes, the viewer is dragged along on Okabe's journey to discover time travel, and that journey is a blast. Every new development is fun and Okabe's frivolous and carefree personality makes the viewer watch eagerly as he succeeds at inventing time travel. And then, shit hits the fan and things get real. Okabe has to struggle against the effects he's made in the timeline, and is forced to watch one of his friends get killed over and over as he fails to save them. It's at this point that the other characters get their development; gender issues are discussed, backstories are explored, relationships deepen, that one romantic subplot gets resolved. When the end finally comes, and the main conflict is over, you the viewer are ecstatic for every member of the cast.

At least, that's how I felt when I watched Steins;Gate, and in this case I think watching it dubbed definitely helped. Funimation made the dialog smoother and more relevant to me, a westerner. J Michael Tatum chewed the scenery as Okabe, but he was not painful to listen to while shouting. Mayuri's "tutaroo" thing was dulled down, and dropped for a lot of the dialog. The voice choice for Daru made it so that he was a loser, but he was a loser you could take seriously as a hacker and computer expert. I've gushed enough about the dub, but it bears mentioning that characters are brought to life through acting, and they are only as good as their actors.

An Anime Without Anime

I was very surprised to learn during gigguk's review that this was a widely applauded anime back when it premiered because Steins;Gate doesn't seem like the type of anime than anime fans would like. Anime fans are after all, attracted to the various tropes and eccentricities of anime, and honestly, I don't know how I can better put it than that Steins;Gate is an anime without much anime in it. There are no scenes where the animation inexplicably becomes cheap, or everyone becomes a chibi for comedic effect; a character is never shot down and ends up in the OTZ position; there are no sweat drops or anger veins super-imposed on a characters head; and the main character doesn't even have a shounen-esque hot-bloodedness that's fueled by an insanely large appetite. There is one scene where a male character walks in on a female character in a state of undress and gets assaulted for it, but I say this is negligible considering there is a female character who wears a skirt and does not have an absurd amount of panty shots/fanservice within the show. But I digress. Those tropes and cliches are the stuff that makes an anime an anime, isn't it? That's what anime fans eat up so much that it's practically impossible to see an anime without any of these tropes, right?

Why on earth was this such a hit within the anime community then? I was beginning to think that maybe, just maybe, there was a group of anime fans beyond the kawaii uguu~ dorks and the Narutards that actually appreciates a good story that happens to be animated in Japan. This thought gave me hope that these people would eventually become a more vocal minority, and that anime would be forced to "grow up" and quit using cheap effects and tropes that were invented to cut animation budgets back when anime was just budding in Japan. But then I remembered that in the same season that Attack on Titan stormed the anime world, they aired a second season of Oreimo, and I dropped this notion.

I may be surprised that this was popular, but I'm not surprised at all that an "anime without anime" happened to be the one that told the best story. How the hell can you take a story seriously with sweat drops or OTZ shenanigans? You can't. Those types of cues are meant for comedies and children's shows, neither of which are exactly the vehicle for a good story. Moreover, anime "stories" usually fall into a couple of cookie cutter styles. You know that ultra-powerful fighting anime where aliens and demons fight each other with ultimate power and a young but spunky hero finds his ultimate power and defeats the bad guys (sometimes with giant robots!)? Or how about that one where the school girl/boy has feelings for another school girl/boy and they have wacky school girl/boy hijinks and misunderstandings until they get together at the end? Or what about that super deep and mysterious psychological thriller where the genius protagonist discusses Freud and wins his battle of ideals?

I won't lie; there are trace amounts of all of those in Steins;Gate, but really not much more than you would find in a Joss Whedon sci-fi show or a reasonably self-aware sitcom. The point is, however that so much of anime is repetitive garbage and the same story with different blank slate characters. This isn't just an anime thing though, but anime fans tolerate this shit to the point where self-mockery is the norm rather than the exception these days. That is why this "anime without anime" thing is so important to me here. It automatically separates itself from the herd and gets your attention, and ends up cutting off a bunch of bullshit that otherwise slows down a story's progression.

One thing makes Steins;Gate stand out regarding this "anime without anime" thing, and that's its love story.

This is almost too easy to mock. The vast majority of anime suffer from the Inuyasha Relationship. You have two characters, one a tough guy or otherwise stoic male, and a female, an overly emotional tsundere. They're in love, probably because the male saved the female's life, or otherwise is just attractive and did something nice for her once. All of the side characters know it's going to happen, and so does the audience. In fact, by the middle of the series it becomes painfully obvious that those two are going to become a couple by the end. And yet neither admits they like the other. There will be a couple of close calls; they'll be alone together and almost confess, but then someone shows up and ruins it, or some other wacky hijinks or misunderstanding causes an oh-so-temporary riff between the two.

Yes, this does happen in western media, especially in a lot of kids shows and teen dramas. But in anime, it often seems like this is the only way a relationship can work. I remember that Mysterious Girlfriend X was hailed for breaking this trend by having the main couple be dating from the get-go...only to realize that this was a show that revolved around spit fetishes. If your fetish bait has the most creative relationship arc out of a whole genre, you have a problem.

At the core of Steins;Gate is the love story between Okabe and Kurisu. It starts off really poorly; Okabe almost gets arrested for poking around Kurisu when he's shocked to find her alive. She then emasculates him in a scientific debate. Kurisu finds Okabe's rantings about her being dead interesting, and follows him at his lab. From there on things...are still pretty icy for a while. Kurisu's constantly trying to debunk the time travel theories, but keeps getting pulled down the rabbit hole. Okabe refuses to call her by her name, instead referring to her as his assistant, or calling her a zombie. They argue a lot, but do so less and less as the story goes on. The two of them start to warm up, and they develop a chemistry that is more natural and entertaining than anything else in the series. By episode twelve it looks like they're good friends now. Maybe they'll hook up soon.

And then shit hits the fan, and their relationship is put on the back burner while the plot gets untangled...supposedly. Their relationship doesn't advance any, sure, but as Okabe is desperately trying to undo his damage to the timeline, he relies more on Kurisu. His episode-by-episode plots involve developing relationships with the other characters, but Kurisu is always involved, always being the pillar of support he needs. The entire subplot is executed remarkably well. It feels more like two adults falling for each other rather than a couple of teens trying to out-awkward each other into a relationship. Their relationship is a slow burn, and there are no crappy romantic comedy snafus. To be blunt: This is who a romance would play out in a Hollywood blockbuster, rather than an anime. It'd be foolish to say that it's the best love story ever written (the Lorax gets that distinction), but it's one I'll take over just about every other anime romance.

The World of Science Fiction

I'm gonna jump off the "why anime sucks" soapbox for a moment and switch to another one. This may come as a surprise, but I actually really don't like sci-fi stories that much. I've seen the Star Wars movies, and a few bits here and there of Star Trek, etc. I read a few books by Asimov and other pioneers of the genre, but science fiction as a whole never clicked with me. I've grown to be wary of most futuristic shows, and sci-fi anime in particular tends to bore me (of course).

Here recently, I think I figured out why this is. Here's the problem: Most science fiction authors are concerned primarily with world-building. They tend to think that if they build a world that is interesting enough, the characters don't matter. The author will focus on the "how" and "what" behind the world they've created, and will go into minutia to make sure the entire thing makes sense. The reader or viewer will be invested enough in this brave new culture that they'll want to learn more about it while the plot progresses. Take for example Fahrenheit 451. It's a satire/allegory about the continuing waste of modern technology, but it is also the prototypical sci-fi story: There are hover cars, super nuclear weapons, televisions that cover entire walls. The main character really isn't all that important except for the fact that he's the guy the author wants to use to reject the trend of society. The same is true of Terry Prachett's Discworld series, and many other science fiction works.

I suppose this isn't really a "flaw" in the story telling so much as a design choice I don't agree with. But if you look at sci-fi works that explore the characters as well, ask the "why" and "how come" of their world, like Douglas Adams' Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, they tend to be much better recieved and honestly, they make better stories. Compare Adams with Isaac Asimov's I, Robot, which asks a very interesting question about the "morality" of robots. The problem is, his story is kind of boring. So much so that when it was adapted to film, even Will Smith couldn't save it (and before the fans of the book/movie start complaining about how "unfaithful" the adaptation was, the movies for the Hunger Games and the Harry Potter series were just as liberal and turned out a lot better).

So what does all of this have to do with Steins;Gate? Well, the creators of Steins;Gate didn't build much of a world. Instead, they just used the one we already live in. Rather than placing it in space, or on Earth in the distant future, they used the year 2010. We are all pretty much aware of how the world's physics work in 2010 Earth, so not a lot of explanation has to be made. Since the world does not have to be built, much of the story revolves around...well, the story. The authors didn't have this new world to explore, so they had to make the story's premise and characters interesting. I've already talked about that in detail, but I'll repeat that having that focus is what influences my tastes in science fiction.

The biggest pitfall of using the real world as a setting for a science fiction story is that it ends up being too normal. People want flashy stuff, otherwise they'd just watch a slice of life show, which, trust me, we don't need anymore of right now. The authors of Steins;Gate, however, used real life elements to still make their version of Earth more interesting than ours. The two obvious examples are John Titor being a real person, and CERN being an evil organization that wants to use time travel to take over the world, rather than a benign research facility in Switzerland. John Titor was a hoax, but you can't fault someone who goes through his logs or even chatted with him back in 2001 from wistfully wondering "why couldn't that be true?" That sort of awe-inspiring inspiration is the type of feeling that science fiction was created to evoke.

The Science and Ethics of Time Travel


In order to write a story about time travel, one pretty much has to write their own comprehensive theory about time travel. Many authors will just snag their theories from already established movies like Bladerunner or Back to the Future. I'm not criticizing stories for doing this; after all, just like with world building, there's no sense in building your own if you can gank a real one and make it better. The creators of Steins;Gate, however, decided to rip off a less well known but more intriguing system, from an Internet user named John Titor. Titor was an anonymous poster on several forums that claimed to be a time traveler from the year 2036, where the United States has been destroyed by civil war, and the other world powers are all but extinguished. Rather than considering time to be one singular line that runs through space, he proffered that time was also affected by the multiple world/universe theory; that each possible state that could have or did exist does exist in an alternate world. Steins;Gate in particular calls these "world lines," and in altering the time stream, all one does is jump from one world line to another. Time travel itself is possible only by sending bits of data through a black hole, so one can send memories or emails but not actual people (until a time machine is invented in 2036, anyways). In order to change an event that the universe has fated to happen, however, you have to significantly change the timeline to diverge by more than 1% (of what I'm not sure) to a different world line.

If this all seems pretty complicated, that's because it is a bit more so than your normal time travel faire. Cause and effect aren't quite as closely related, and fate plays an enormous role in the process. There is no such thing as a stable time loop, ala Futurama. To be honest, I don't understand the entire concept, and there a few other things that need some explanation that the series rushed through, such as how they invented a time machine that wouldn't turn people into jelly. It's not the most all-explaining theory of time travel, and even today people are dissecting John Titor's posts, showing how the science is flawed.

But that doesn't bother me as much. This is science FICTION, after all, and when you watch something with that label, you have to take it to heart that some stuff is just made up. Titor Time isn't really "bad science" though; it's a working theory, just not a real world scientifically backed one. Writing stories and doing science both require some form of imagination, and if nothing else John Titor had that going for him.

Ever since I was a kid, I've loved time travel stories, especially those that explore the ethical ramifications of travelling through time. Obviously you have movies like Back to the Future that sort of discuss this: Marty McFly's trip to the past made it so that he doesn't exist in the future, and he has to return to the past and make sure his parents get together. But Back to the Future is tame, as far as I'm concerned. I really like the time travel stories that have teeth.

For example, my favorite video game series is the Chrono series. The first installment, Chrono Trigger, uses the butterfly effect theory where minute changes in the past can drastically alter the future, e.g., giving someone's family a piece of Jerky for free in the past makes that person's descendants extraordinarily generous and happy in the future. Without doing so, the family is miserable, and everyone hates everyone because the patriarch is so greedy (not to mention you can't get an item that you need to make some of the best weapons in the game). And this is just a minor sidequest. The second one, Chrono Cross, uses the same theory, but instead of hopping through time, you hop from one timeline to another and see side-by-side how different things become. In one instance, you either choose to leave a poisoned friend behind to die, or you end up ruining a jungle, leading to a genocide of fairies (not making this up). You, the player, are forced to make a decision that will fuck up something. And you have to deal with that.

Steins;Gate takes this concept to another level. As Okabe begins altering the timeline, he makes things better for his friends. One character's father is saved from a horrible accident; another one is turned into a girl, like they wanted; and a third one meets her father, a man who died before she got to know him. But doing all of this leads to a world line where Mayuri is destined to be killed. In order to save her, Okabe must undo all of this work. He is forced to take the girl's gender away from them. He has to essentially ask the girl to allow her father to die. He has to erase the third girl's memories of the father she just got to meet. And in the end, he has to return to a world line where his love interest, Kurisu, is stabbed to death.

Ain't that some shit?

In hindsight, Okabe seems like an incredibly selfish person. But you the viewer find it impossible to fault him for it. In the end, you can at least be happy that the tough choices he made ended up being the one that created the best ending. Still, you're put directly into his shoes throughout most of the second act, and you are forced to contemplate exactly how fucked up time travelling can be.

The OVA


Gonna break sequence here a bit to get this monkey off my back: I didn't like the OVA. I felt it was too anime-in-a-box, and while the ending of it was happy and made you feel good, it was too sudden and overstated to fit in with the rest of the show's tone.

If any of you have ever read Charles Dickens' Great Expectations, you may know that the story has two endings. The first one is somewhat sad; Pip, the main character, finds out that his love interest throughout the entire story had married with children, and the reader is told that there is no chance he will ever get with her. This ending fits in well with the rest of the story though, and while the ending is sad it feels right. But Dickens' audience really didn't like this ending. They wanted Pip to get the girl at the end, or at least be hopeful that he could get with her eventually. So Dickens' wrote a second ending, where he gave his readers that hope. I feel like the second ending breaks too much away from what the story was going for as a whole, so I don't like it as much as the first.

That in a nutshell is my problem with the Steins;Gate OVA. It gave the viewers what they wanted, but it doesn't really feel right in the context of the rest of the story.

This Must Be the Will of Steins;Gate

Steins;Gate has a mature story, well rounded and likeable main characters, a lack of anime, what I deem to be a proper focus of sci-fi and dark implications of time travel. It may not be the best anime in the world, but it was one seemingly made for me. I'm not blind to the flaws, and I'm not gonna be a huge fanboy going out of this, but this is the type of story that will make people take anime seriously. This is the type of show that ought to be on American television, because it is not just a good anime, it is a good television show. Steins;Gate isn't Breaking Bad, and it's not Game of Thrones, but it does stand on its own compared to tv shows that aren't meant for kids or teenage sci-fi nerds.

More of this, less moe, please.


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"Every man's heart one day beats its final beat, his lungs breath their final breath. And if what that man did in his life, makes the blood pulse through the body of others, and makes them believe deeper in something larger than life, then his essence, his spirit, will be immortalized by the storytellers, by the loyalty, by the memory, of those who honor him and make whatever the man did live forever."
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10-13-2013, 02:47 PM
Post: #25
RE: Prove Me Wrong
Glad that you enjoyed the show. Now watch OniAi.

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10-13-2013, 03:38 PM
Post: #26
RE: Prove Me Wrong
Hahaha, go eat shit.

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"Every man's heart one day beats its final beat, his lungs breath their final breath. And if what that man did in his life, makes the blood pulse through the body of others, and makes them believe deeper in something larger than life, then his essence, his spirit, will be immortalized by the storytellers, by the loyalty, by the memory, of those who honor him and make whatever the man did live forever."
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10-13-2013, 04:56 PM
Post: #27
RE: Prove Me Wrong
"K-ON!" ?

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10-13-2013, 07:54 PM
Post: #28
RE: Prove Me Wrong
No, but for serious, follow it up with FMA Brotherhood. It's got a few anime staples, but you'll enjoy the plot and characters immensely.

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10-13-2013, 11:05 PM
Post: #29
RE: Prove Me Wrong
Yes. What Stephan said!

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10-14-2013, 04:18 PM
Post: #30
RE: Prove Me Wrong
Hey Truth, I think you should really check this show out. It's called Love Lab.

Here's the Link

I know what you might be thinking. "Oh Replay, why are you showing me this? This is just some stupid school girl shit that I explicitly told you not to show me." Well, I'll tell you why this is different from all the other marvelous school girl Anime series out there.

1.Most Anime is based around high school kids. This is based around MIDDLE school kids.
2.Beneath all the Moe and cute girls, the show holds a deeper meaning of friendship.
3.Unlike most "stupid school girl shit", this story actually has a unique plot and the characters have a solid goal to reach.
4.The characters are very complex and have their own little back stories.
5.The opening is really catchy

You should really watch this Truth. I think you'd really enjoy this.

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10-14-2013, 04:46 PM (This post was last modified: 10-14-2013 04:47 PM by walter.)
Post: #31
RE: Prove Me Wrong
(10-14-2013 04:18 PM)Replay Wrote:  1.Most Anime is based around high school kids. This is based around MIDDLE school kids.
2.Beneath all the Moe and cute girls, the show holds a deeper meaning of friendship.
3.Unlike most "stupid school girl shit", this story actually has a unique plot and the characters have a solid goal to reach.
4.The characters are very complex and have their own little back stories.
5.The opening is really catchy

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Spoiler(Show)
Please just go watch FMAB already, Truth...

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10-14-2013, 06:32 PM (This post was last modified: 10-14-2013 06:36 PM by Airrest.)
Post: #32
RE: Prove Me Wrong
(09-12-2013 10:27 PM)Truthordeal Wrote:  1) Being a good SHOW, not just a good anime, and 2) One that I haven't seen or am unlikely to ever watch on my own. To make critera two a bit easier, the only anime I've watched in the past couple of years have had to do with swords, mysteries, and mocking things.

Other than that, everything else is fair game. It can be long, short, ongoing, completed, any subgenre, etc.

I know this is technically over, but here you go, Truth. You can trust me on this. I'm not your typical anime nerd.

1) Space Brothers. Pretty much along the exact same lines. It's mature and the characters are extremely well-written. It's a good show and a great story.

OR

2) Bakuman. Even though it's actually about making manga, it's probably one of the most well-written stories in manga/anime, though it has some goofy characters. However, it has some of the best characters I've ever seen in anime.

Out of the two though, I'd probably go with Space Brothers. It'll fit more what you're looking for. I'm not kidding and cannot stress this enough, these two shows, especially Space Brothers are Tier 1 anime. For real.
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10-14-2013, 07:27 PM
Post: #33
RE: Prove Me Wrong
Since you like pro wrestling Truth, I recommend this season's Sekai de Ichiban Tsuyoku Naritai! too.

#Sweg
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10-14-2013, 08:52 PM
Post: #34
RE: Prove Me Wrong
(10-14-2013 07:27 PM)Replay Wrote:  Since you like pro wrestling Truth, I recommend this season's Sekai de Ichiban Tsuyoku Naritai! too.

Pro wrestling in anime is so real. I dunno why anyone watches it.

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