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What is your writing process?
12-30-2015, 08:36 PM (This post was last modified: 12-30-2015 08:37 PM by thedarkboco.)
Post: #1
What is your writing process?
I brought this up this up in the AF skype chat a while back and I got some interesting responses, so I thought it would make a good discussion topic.

When I get around to scripting I disconnect myself from the internet, attempt to get an idea of what I want to get accomplished content in the episode/video. I then skim through the episode with out subs/audio in Hitfilm and grab all the scenes I think I can use for the time. I then rewatch the footage I have chosen and write to that.

Also as a side note I always try to keep a to write notes with me in-case if I have any ideas when I'm not at my computer.

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12-31-2015, 12:11 AM
Post: #2
RE: What is your writing process?
I shoot the shit with whoever I'm scripting with while watching whatever show we're gonna try to make jokes for.

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12-31-2015, 12:58 AM
Post: #3
RE: What is your writing process?
I take bits and pieces of knowledge from my mind and fit them together like LEGO bricks into one, big construction. To me, it's not what the pieces are; it's how I use 'em.

You are what you put your time into.

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12-31-2015, 08:09 AM
Post: #4
RE: What is your writing process?
Stare at a blank google doc for two weeks until I come home from work and force myself to at least write something, then I ask someone on Skype for their opinion because I need that confidence boost - then I write more with renewed vigor until I have a the semblance of a script and go with that. Rinse, Repeat.

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12-31-2015, 09:56 AM
Post: #5
RE: What is your writing process?
I would have ideas beforehand of 1 or 2 great ideas I had for the episode. Then I would watch the episode once by myself just observing shit that I could make fun of. Generally I would come up with jokes based on the plot, with a couple wacky ideas here and there. Then I would bring my co-writer in, and we'd watch the episode together and brainstorm. He's the one who has the easier time thinking outside the box. And whatever ideas I could feed to him would potentially spark some crazy idea from him. He takes me outside the box, and I keep him grounded down. Ying and Yang, baby

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01-01-2016, 04:38 AM (This post was last modified: 01-01-2016 04:39 AM by TheHawk.)
Post: #6
RE: What is your writing process?
I watch the episode once with something to type/write with and just spew out ideas that come to me as I watch it based on my first impression. Then, I rewatch the episode while taking bullet pointed notes on each scene that include: what's happening in the scene, who's in it, great shot options, animation quality, and possible hindrances. I then go through and see what scenes actually contribute anything to the story I want to tell and cut the ones I don't see good potential for. I then go through and start writing out dialogue for each character based on what scenes I want to use.

I then sit back for a few days and do something else, then come back and edit the script with fresh eyes to try and improve it.

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01-01-2016, 02:51 PM
Post: #7
RE: What is your writing process?
(01-01-2016 04:38 AM)TheHawk Wrote:  I then sit back for a few days and do something else, then come back and edit the script with fresh eyes to try and improve it.

I can't emphasize enough how important this part is.

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01-01-2016, 08:52 PM
Post: #8
RE: What is your writing process?
For my scripting process, I would first watch the episode(s) I will be using for my parody. Sometimes I would type out specific scenes I intend on using, but now this step is done mentally. I do know people that opening their Video Editing Program and cut each scene they want to use so that they can put it together into the timeline.

Now here is something that I don't think a lot of solo writers do, which is why I feel as if there is a higher chance of making a good parody if you are writing with a co-writer: For parts of the scene I intend of creating comedic dialogue, I would talk a loud as the character(s) and continue to say shit until I say something that makes me laugh. It's no different from having a co-writer except the objective is more towards getting them to laugh. We usually tend to write jokes without verbally saying them or knowing if they are laughable By doing this method, it helps you know what you and your audience may find funny.(I can't say that every joke you found funny would be funny to your audience but you will still have people who will enjoy it.) Once I look over the script and see a balance between a comprehensive story-line and comedy, I send them out to the Voice Actors or get my brother to look over it.

(01-01-2016 02:51 PM)LightningCrabz Wrote:  
(01-01-2016 04:38 AM)TheHawk Wrote:  I then sit back for a few days and do something else, then come back and edit the script with fresh eyes to try and improve it.

I can't emphasize enough how important this part is.

While I think I get the idea, I'm kind of interested in hearing one of you guys explain why this part is so significant?
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01-01-2016, 09:52 PM
Post: #9
RE: What is your writing process?
I only write scripts when I unintentionally think of enough jokes whilst I'm watching whatever I'm making fun of. I then, immediately and without haste, open up celtx and try to get the whole thing done in one session, whilst I'm still fresh to it all. Hell, the other night it was a 10PM-9AM session.
Although this wasn't for an abridged series and probably isn't too healthy, I still imagine it could apply to anything.

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01-01-2016, 10:38 PM
Post: #10
RE: What is your writing process?
(01-01-2016 08:52 PM)CrasherSurge Wrote:  
(01-01-2016 02:51 PM)LightningCrabz Wrote:  
(01-01-2016 04:38 AM)TheHawk Wrote:  I then sit back for a few days and do something else, then come back and edit the script with fresh eyes to try and improve it.

I can't emphasize enough how important this part is.

While I think I get the idea, I'm kind of interested in hearing one of you guys explain why this part is so significant?

Letting your script sit for a week and a few days is crucial for getting a script you're happy with and written to the best of your abilities. They even teach this process in my Creative Media class.

Because let's be absolutely honest, there has always been a time where everyone has finished an episode then look back at it and say "Hmmm, I could've done this part better by _____". No one's good enough to write up a golden script that has no need for revising. So this process is to control that more. Besides getting critique from two or more people, they're seeing it with fresh eyes. So to get into that state where you can see it in a better light, letting it sit for a few days and coming back to it is the way to go.

Think of it as you would an essay. You get peer feedback and revise it. If I'm very eager, I shorten it to a day or two. But most of the time I leave it for 5-6 days. And most of the time, even if it's the tiniest thing, there's always SOMETHING that I like to change for the better.

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01-02-2016, 04:30 PM
Post: #11
RE: What is your writing process?
(01-01-2016 08:52 PM)CrasherSurge Wrote:  
(01-01-2016 02:51 PM)LightningCrabz Wrote:  
(01-01-2016 04:38 AM)TheHawk Wrote:  I then sit back for a few days and do something else, then come back and edit the script with fresh eyes to try and improve it.

I can't emphasize enough how important this part is.

While I think I get the idea, I'm kind of interested in hearing one of you guys explain why this part is so significant?

Basically, it's good to look at the script from a fresh perspective before you edit it. Giving yourself some distance between when you wrote the script and when you edit it allows you to be more objective. Something that seemed hilarious a week ago at 1:00 am may not look so great now. Some of my most popular jokes were written weeks after the initial script was finished.

This applies to any type of writing, not just abridging. It's one of the basics that nearly every writing class I've seen will teach. And, it's an aspect that most people ignore.

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01-02-2016, 09:34 PM (This post was last modified: 01-02-2016 09:35 PM by LightningCrabz.)
Post: #12
RE: What is your writing process?
I don't want to shove like 5 quoted messages in here, but I'm piggybacking off Hawk and Dee.

As an art dude, I can attest that this principle applies to any sort of creative project, regardless of medium. When we spend a couple hours deep in thought about the thing we're working on, it becomes difficult for us to step back again and examine it from a bigger picture. Which is key for spotting vital problems and properly evaluating it's worth.

You may be spend a long time writing a back and forth dialogue leading up to a hilarious punch line. But a couple days later you may look at it and think "actually the joke isn't that great" or "actually this scene doesn't really flow with the rest of the script" or even "actually, this character wouldn't make this kind of joke at all. Its just not his/her style."

Similarly with my art stuff, I may spend a few hours detailing out a focal point of a piece I'm working on. But if I don't make myself stop for a bit and come back with a fresh mind, I won't realize that my lighting is all wrong, or the perspective looks wonky. If I'm starting something from scratch and I don't break for a couple hours, I may get deep into it and realize it wasn't a good concept to begin with and I should've explored other ideas at the beginning.

Its just how we are as humans, that we get so emotionally invested into the part that we're doing that its hard to think beyond it. And unless you allow your MIND a break (not just your body), you'll have trouble spotting the more general problems.

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01-26-2016, 02:37 PM
Post: #13
RE: What is your writing process?
I usually turn on the episode and after each scene I write the jokes as they come to me after asking myself "how can i make this funnier?"

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01-26-2016, 05:07 PM
Post: #14
RE: What is your writing process?
Munjeej and I drink copious amounts of rum in order to get into the pirate mindset...or perhaps just because we like rum. And we don't always write stuff, either. That's why our abridge is best abridge.

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01-27-2016, 12:38 AM
Post: #15
RE: What is your writing process?
(05-27-2011 11:42 PM)Truthordeal Wrote:  I shit on the keyboard and see what my video editor makes with it.

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05-11-2016, 01:34 AM
Post: #16
RE: What is your writing process?
first ill watch the episode and just see what funny stuff comes to mind, at the same time im also mindful of how everything appears without context, i.e audio/subs. If need be ill go through it muted and THEN see what i come up with, because staying relavent to the true plot can often be distracting.

Ill basically though try to write something for everything so, in theory i would end up with a solid episode of script before editing it down to only the necessities and the best filler jokes.

then with everything in mind ill rewatch it going through my draft script and look at how editing the video, minus the obvious choices i saw and noted immediately or self explained with the script, can improve or enable jokes, to warp context.
I also keep in mind what i could insert as special effects and overlaying animation, as well as keeping track of perculiar scenes where the actions in another scene could set up something funny, good thing about anime is you have little body motion and usually little scene movement either, you can kind of green screen a shot by what remains static to varying degrees to overlay elsewhere, be it removing the background only or the body parts, etc. Basically most scenes will allow full manipulation of certain elements so long as your always covering parts of the background that never get exposed, such as erasing a characters arm using the background cache, up to the points of background that arent revealed by its movement. After that if you have the right shot you can replace the arm with the opposite, an arm extracted from the background.
Also theres times i might just be able to outright animate something new in there.
Its all things i like to keep in mind, and i consider my options within all possibilities.
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