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The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
04-18-2012, 05:21 PM (This post was last modified: 07-27-2014 10:25 AM by Truthordeal.)
Post: #1
Smile The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
Let me start off with a disclaimer. Entertainment is subjective. Many different people enjoy many different things for many different reasons. That's the end of that I don't have anything to add to it... This post addresses some of my observations of the tangible aspects of popular, successful, and quality shows. As well as many of the pitfalls and short-sightedness of bad abridged shows. And that is my goal: to help improve bad abridged shows. Because bad abridged shows piss me off. Some of this might be my own personal taste, some of it may be vague enough to help you out if you need it. Its your discretion to decide.

Table of contents:
------------------
> Develop a Vision <
- Target Audience
- Style of Comedy
- Find a Gimick
------------------
> Conduct Yourself and Be Aware of Your Peers <
------------------
> Write Good <
- Study Comedy
- Think About Writing
- Eliminate Dead Air and Tired Jokes
- Steal Jokes
------------------
> Feedback, Feedback, Feedback <
------------------
> Production Value <
- Editing
- Voice Acting

------------------

Develop a Vision
This is a very important step that too many people overlook. Think about internet parodies in terms of a free market (with viewers being the consumers). Well rational people beware because the market is fragmented and oversaturated, dog. And simply being a parody isn't enough anymore. You have to have a strategy to draw people in. You need to have a ideologically consistent vision for your show. Its hard to define exactly what that means so instead I will outline a few properties that help to shape such a thing. 1) A target audience. 2) A style of comedy. 3) A gimmick.

1) Target Audience
Its rare to find someone who enjoys every parody they see on the Internet. I'm sure they exist, but don't rely on that group to be your audience. Mostly because they're few and far between, but also because they will like your show no matter what apparently. You need to have a solid idea in your head of the type of person you aim to entertain. This helps to maintain a little cohesion when you're developing jokes. An easy target audience are you and your friends. Develop a focus group. A go-to, uninvolved 3rd party who can help test jokes and scenarios out. You'll need this a lot at first, but eventually you'll get to a point where you can anticipate their reaction and develop your script ahead of time in a preemptive manner. This anticipation is called "good writing". It means you're already thinking of your show in terms of the target audience and not yourself. Boom. I just blew your mind with marketing.

2) Style of Comedy
Remember when I said simply being a parody isn't enough anymore? Well, let me explain what I mean by that. Once upon a time, it was acceptable to dub cartoon footage and just say some naughty words and make fun of what was happening on screen. Many early WeeklyTubeShow videos are like this. Here's an example:


This video may still be charming in its own little way, but that's because it existed before the oversaturatation took over. Think about it like this... How do you think "I Love Lucy" would do in ratings on TV if it were put on the air today? Not well. These days we have sitcoms like "The Office" which experiment with social comedy, we have cartoons like those on Adult Swim which test the boundaries of comedy in surrealism, and we have the Internet where you can find the most oddball and unusual types of entertainment. People have seen it all so they expect more. On top of being a parody, you need to find another style of comedy to mix into it. Take a few examples from our own scene. Pokemon 'Bridged finds humor by toying with the viewer's expectation. The writers of that show know what you expect and they often times do the exact opposite just to fuck with you. PurpleEyesWTF finds humor in utter insanity and randomness. But he does it such a unapologetically and in-your-face way that you have no choice but to laugh. TeamFourStar does a lot of character humor. Each of their characters have a distinct voice and their own reoccurring jokes. When these characters interact, their reactions to each other is often what will make you laugh. LittleKuribaw submerges his shows in an ocean of satire. Almost every joke in Ninjabridge is a statement. From TurkeyLegs lampooning the user Chincknwings, to the Hokage "dangerous box" scenes making fun of Box of Danger, his jokes all have a deeper meaning and that's where he stands out. All of these Abridgers have found success in mixing and mashing styles of humor into their parody. Nobody can tell you exactly how to do that, you just have to experiment and find what works.

3) Find a Gimick
People have a short attention span. A gimmick gets in and penetrates the audiences perception of your show before they even watch it. But you have to catch their attention quickly or they're likely to overlook you. Remember, you're on the Internet, all a viewer has to do is click to find something better and never return to you again. Find an element that people will recognize and identify with your show. Something so potent that even when the viewer returns to the source material, they are reminded of your work. This can be done with a stand-out characterization like WeeklyTubeShow's depiction of Namekians as African Americans. A gimmick can also be found in a presentation format like Airrest's recent sketch-comedy style Orange Girl. A clever title for your show can get catch peoples attention like mattroks101's Electric Anime Batman.

Conduct Yourself and Be Aware of Your Peers
Keep up with the people around you. Don't isolate yourself. Make friends and connections with as many people as you can. Watch every new episode that comes out and share your thoughts. See what works for some people and apply it to your show. Learn from each other and create prosperity and nurture creativity among the community. All that gay shit.

A perfect example of what not to do is Box of Danger. They have potential and notoriety to make something really great, and they have made really good stuff in the past... but they fell behind by being super negative all the time and acting like a bunch of jackasses. Nobody wants to associate themselves with Box of Danger and their popularity has waned, at least with their peers. They have even become something of a joke with LittleKoriboh's "Dangerous Box" videos and the joke Twitter account, Abripster, often parroting exaggerated sentiments from the Box of Danger crew. Another isolation case is SSJGozar. This guy used to make Dragon Ball Z parodies before TeamFourStar. But TFS came out and they were better, so Gozar got all super jealous and dwelled on that until he eventually quit.

A positive example of good conduct among the community is Takahata101. The guy hardly ever turns down a role and he's a super nice guy to everybody. I'd go so far as to say he puts his own opinions of the script aside and helps out anyway. Which is a really humble way of conducting oneself. Another good example is PurpleEyesWTF. I've never seen that guy say one negative thing about anybody. And I love him for it. This is not to say you can't be critical. Be critical. But for the purpose of helping people improve. Always be willing to help other people and you'll find they'll be willing to help you!

Write Good
With Abridged parodies, the only fucking thing that is original is the writing. The animation, the music, the sound effects, all of that shit is done for you. So there is NO GODDAMNED REASON to put out a show if the writing sucks ass. Not only are you the worst kind of piece of shit by stealing other people's work, but you're not even doing it well. The problem with our scene is that almost anybody can make an Abridged parody. But in every case where anyone can do something, it most assuredly means that not everyone should. Too many people see one or two episodes of Yu-Gi-Oh Abridged and think to themselves "I can do that". Well no you can't. At least not right away. LittleKuribah has years of experience and he has a very firm grasp on what other people find funny. Most white nerds (you) aren't funny. Not right now, anyway. You need to shape your writing skills. You're already working under extreme constraints by altering an existing product, if you suck at comedy to begin with, you are bound for failure. And you'll piss me off. I don't know which is worse. Try some of the following.

2) Study Comedy
Believe it or not, this can be done. There are dozens of theories on comedy. There is a tried and tested structure to a good joke. All you have to do is try to understand it. Some people become good comedic writers by studying it academically. Some lucky people are born with an intrinsic understanding of good comedy. And some people develop an understanding by watching an inordinate amount of stand-up, sitcoms, and parodies (I put myself in this category). But no matter how you do it, there is always something to learn by watching other people. Especially those outside of the Abridging world.


1) Really Think. I'm Serious. Use Your Brain, Asshole.
Think about every joke you write. It's easy to look at something and make fun of it. It's not as easy to look at something and say something insightful. I heard an interview on NPR once with the editor of The Onion. He said something along the lines of "a joke that does not mean anything isn't really a joke". While I don't agree 100% with this statement, I think it raises a good point. Shallow humor doesn't travel very far. Its easy to say poop or dick and get a smirk from someone. But to really make someone think about poop or dicks... That is good comedy! You should want to stimulate your audience. Don't just remind them of what's funny. Show them humor in things that aren't funny.

Step step) Eliminate Dead Air and Tired Jokes
I struggle with this myself. Sometimes its just hard to think of a joke for a particular scene. Especially expository scenes. But I believe its better to just skip it entirely and move on than to let dead air slip into your show. As I said earlier, you've got only one shred of originality to your material. Don't let that be the weak part. As for tired jokes. Even if a joke is good, if its been done a thousand times, don't do it again. Often times people will do this then claim "but I was satirizing that tired joke", but you have to realize just because something is satire doesn't mean it isn't the joke. Its not a new take if you're just making fun of that joke. You're still using it. Even if its done ironically. Pokemon 'Bridged does a lot of jokes that have been done before, but they often times recognize this and take it to new extremes. That's one way of avoiding it.

Step Carlos Mencia) Steal Jokes
This might be a controversial bit of advice. It may also be slightly confusing because earlier I talked about how your writing is the only original part of what you're doing. But work with me here. Take something that's already funny and put a Mexican accent on it. Figuratively, of course. If you see a joke that really impresses you and you think to yourself "man, I wish I came up with that". Then pretend like you did. If nobody notices you stole it, then for all intents and purpose, you didn't. There's a really great book by Robert Greene called, The 48 Laws of Power. It outlines 48 basic principles for success; and in the case of the book success is power. It has examples from history on why these work and gives practical advice on how you can apply these laws to your own endeavors. Anyway, Law Number 7, according to Robert Greene, is "Get others to do the work for you, but always take the credit". It's a tactic of evil, but nobody will tell you it isn't effective. It's the tree falling in the woods and making a sound argument.


Most importantly, however... Beyond deceiving your viewers, if you find a good use for a joke in your own material, you're demonstrating that you understand why that joke is funny. With that understanding, you're expanding your own abilities. And eventually you'll be able to make original jokes that compete with it or even surpass it in terms of quality. And as far as originality goes. Even original stuff isn't original. Everybody borrows from everybody. It's the creative process. Led Zepplin, Shakespear, Dane Cook, all of the greatest artists throughout history were notorious for stealing ideas. But nobody remembers who they stole from, because these folks did it best. Sorry Louis CK. I... I'm sorry.

Here's a dirty secret. Over the years, WeeklyTubeShow has stolen quite a few jokes outright. umad?

Feedback Feedback Feedback
Feedback is incredibly important. You are what we in the biz like to call an involved 1st party. You will come up with ideas that you think are very funny. But there's no way for you to actually know that on your own. Who's going to stop you from unleashing a bad idea if the only person who knows ahead of time is you? What you need is an uninvolved 3rd party. This party can tell you what they think of your shit so you have a better idea of what other people will think of your work. Though the best kind of parties are the ones with nakedness and drugs.

I wrote earlier about putting together a focus group to test your jokes and ideas. This is definitely a good way to get feedback. But an even better way to get immediate feedback is to write your script with a friend. Find somebody that you have good chemistry with and write together. This turns your 1st party into a group, where each member is a 2nd party to one another. Mathmatical. You can shoot each others' shitty ideas down right away and help build on good ideas. Some writers can make good material on their own, but these are the ones who have a natural sense of comedy.. This probably isn't you. "Work with what you got, and don't pretend to be what you're not." - Me, just now.

Another great avenue for feedback has sprung up recently on this forum are the "Critique Threads". Most people won't go out of their way to give a detailed analysis of your material if there's nothing in it for themselves. People are selfish this way. But a "Critique Thread" is a mutally-benificial, synergetic development where both parties get something out of the process. You get your material critiqued, and the critic gets all the attention. Everybody loves attention. That's why we do what we do! Here are some links:
Airrest's "Promise I'll Be Nice To You" Super Happy Critique Rip-off Thread!
TOC about your abridged series
Ezekieru's Chamber of Ripping Off Innagada (AKA Reviews)

Though still, everyone should try to go to real parties. That's a good place to meet women. And meeting women is the best way to get over abridging.

Production Value
This isn't 2002 anymore. A 240p cilp thrown together in Movie Maker won't impress anyone. These days we have HD footage, cheap production-quality consumer-grade digital microphones, and a whole array of new technology at our disposal. Your viewers expect more. Or at least they should. Some folks like to kick it old school and not edit their shows. But nobody watches their videos. So fuck those guys.

Editing
The most time-consuming process is editing. This is what turns a lot of people off. If it weren't for me, Remix would have quit a long time ago because that motherfucker hates editing (and he was never very good at it). The bottom line is, you need to at least try if you're going to be taken seriously. But if you don't know how to edit, you'll have to teach yourself. Editors on this forum will gladly answer simple questions, but nobody is going to walk you through the whole process. That takes practice. Look up tutorials on YouTube; there are millions of them. Practice different effects by making AMVs or dubs with audio from movies. These are some quick videos that don't require much in the planning department but that you can use to help sharpen your skills.

Voice Acting
I'll admit that I'm pretty weak in this department. I have a very distinguishable voice and I can only do a few different kinds of voices. I'm an okay actor, but I know that my strengths don't lie in voice acting. I'm good at editing and writing. If your voices are weak, find someone to voice for you. There are thousands of would-be voice actors online. All you have to do is search YouTube or VoiceActingAlliance. I don't do much acting myself, but take some advice from these folks.
Ezekieru Wrote:As for anything I'd like to chip in, direction and acting are so important in this kind of community. The most important thing to remember, is to not hold back. If your acting requires you to be loud and yelling a lot, then go for it. If you need to go crazy with it, then go on ahead. I think this contributes a lot to LordMoonstone's success as a comedian, as he isn't afraid to give it his all in recording lines. Pok?mon Bridged's episode 05 benefited so much from his energy, I still consider it one of my favorite episodes to this day. Energy and overacting can really spice up your video, and make a boring script exciting and hilarious. All it takes is a few hours by yourself, a good bit of water, and your mic settings turned down low.
concrete Building Wrote:Delivery is key in just about anything you perform. Especially things like comedy. Like Mr. Gervais said, there's a rhythm to comedy, and if you don't deliver that, nor the line in the best expression, it won't be nearly as funny as it could be. Which kind of leads me to this: Even though you might have something written out very well, there is a multitude of ways to express it. For example, I'm about to have the voice actress who does Misty in my own series redo a line that she did awhile back. Initially, it was supposed to be excitement. And she did that well. But I'm having her do it again, but this time, have it more sexually excited. I feel like the line, the very same line, can now be something that was "meh" to at least a bit funnier.

In Conclusion
Work with yourself. Find your strengths and weaknesses and use them to your advantage. Help your peers. Educate yourself. And for the love of God, make a good show. Nobody wants to see a bad Abridged show. Especially me. I want to throw chairs when I see some shmuck who doesn't realize how much he sucks. Have fun and get a little sunlight every now and then, nerds.
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04-18-2012, 06:19 PM
Post: #2
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
I know I'm gonna get shit for this:

I've read every bit of this. And I agree with just about 90% of it.

The 10% is.. you probably guessed it... Stealing jokes. Not long after Crashersurge and I released episode 1 of Naruto Shippuden Abridged, we got people telling us (and liking the comments that said it) to stop stealing jokes, as Ebisu said in the episode.

So that's simply not something that'll work for everyone. Some people want more creativity.
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04-18-2012, 06:22 PM (This post was last modified: 04-18-2012 06:24 PM by Innagadadavida.)
Post: #3
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
Yeah, I anticipate people will disagree with that. But only because it's a red flag that triggers an instant mind-close. Don't steal jokes from other abridgers though. You clearly don't understand what I meant. Steal jokes from things outside of abridging. Make a new connection. That is creativity. Watch the video too.
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04-18-2012, 06:29 PM
Post: #4
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
Well put, sir. Well put indeed.

Yeah, no stealing jokes though. As you've said, you don't have a lot of room for originality as it is. Don't go giving it away so easily.

Personally, I'd add "NO REFERENCES" for similar (and other) reasons, but this is your guide...

Oh...

(USER IS STILL BANNED)

Chances are, if you're reading this, it's after reading a ridiculously long post by me, something harshly phrased or confrontational, and/or me being stupid. I want to apologize for my above post, and end this signature with a quote of wisdom to soothe your soul.

"Ho ho..hoho hoho..santa for the wondering thismust be a joke in your series!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1"
~A scholar beyond his time

[10:10:35 PM] Airrest (Eric): YOU WERE RIGHT ALL ALONG
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04-18-2012, 06:33 PM (This post was last modified: 04-18-2012 06:34 PM by concrete Building.)
Post: #5
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
Ok, I think I see what they're saying.. Now correct me if I'm wrong:

Let's take the car metaphore. I want to take that car and say... take it apart, but use the same pieces to create a faster, more aerodynamic car, obviously with some upgrading. Or.. take the car and put in a huge sound system, so it's now a moving rock concert.
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04-18-2012, 06:47 PM
Post: #6
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
(04-18-2012 06:29 PM)1KidsEntertainment Wrote:  Yeah, no stealing jokes though. As you've said, you don't have a lot of room for originality as it is. Don't go giving it away so easily.

I'm not here to argue my points. They are there, and I think you'd agree they work. Whether or not it's against your personal morals is your decision. But I urge you to read and think what I said and take it beyond face value.

Don't create a show comprised of entirely stolen jokes. But don't not do a joke just because somebody else did it already. I'm going to be really pissed off if I wrote all that and all anybody talks about is the stealing jokes bit.
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04-18-2012, 06:48 PM
Post: #7
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
Hopefully I can make better episodes using ur guides :3
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04-18-2012, 07:01 PM (This post was last modified: 04-18-2012 07:03 PM by concrete Building.)
Post: #8
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
I was gonna point out something else (And now I look like an ass.)

I think the Voice Acting section should be a bit more than what it is:

Delivery is key in just about anything you perform. Especially things like comedy. Like Mr. Gervais said, there's a rhythm to comedy, and if you don't deliver that, nor the line in the best expression, it won't be nearly as funny as it could be. Which kind of leads me to this: Even though you might have something written out very well, there is a multitude of ways to express it. For example, I'm about to have the voice actress who does Misty in my own series redo a line that she did awhile back. Initially, it was supposed to be excitement. And she did that well. But I'm having her do it again, but this time, have it more sexually excited. I feel like the line, the very same line, can now be something that was "meh" to at least a bit funnier.

So yeah.. Directing- actually directing- is something else that can go in there.

I know, I'm rambling. I'm trying to make a few points at the same time. Sue me.
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04-18-2012, 07:17 PM (This post was last modified: 04-18-2012 07:17 PM by OoziHobo.)
Post: #9
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
I steal jokes. And I get what he means by adding a mexican accent. It's simple, if you're like my friends (and you probably are), then reference humor comes super easy for you. I have to constantly remind my friends I don't like doing references (some slip in regardless), but occasionally someone will pitch a reference and I think, "Hm, you know... that fits surprisingly well within the context of this scene." And then I ask myself, "Why was this reference funny in its original context?" And if I can figure out the answer to that, sometimes I can rebuild the joke, tweak it a little bit, throw on a coat of fresh paint so no one recognizes it, and voila...

I just stole a joke, and all anyone else sees is a mildly entertaining mexican. >.>

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04-18-2012, 07:28 PM
Post: #10
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
Our brains are built to see connections. That's why we all make references when we socialize. It's the people who leave them in the script who I feel personally are being creatively lazy.

The only references I've ever found to be actually creative & funny were ones I didn't know were references, then found out, then lost all perception of it being creative and funny, because the person spoonfeeding it to me had taken it from someone else. See all references to comedic material.

Eh, I think I've exhausted how much I can say about my views on this, in plenty of places.

*shuts up*
*is still banned*

Chances are, if you're reading this, it's after reading a ridiculously long post by me, something harshly phrased or confrontational, and/or me being stupid. I want to apologize for my above post, and end this signature with a quote of wisdom to soothe your soul.

"Ho ho..hoho hoho..santa for the wondering thismust be a joke in your series!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1"
~A scholar beyond his time

[10:10:35 PM] Airrest (Eric): YOU WERE RIGHT ALL ALONG
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04-18-2012, 08:04 PM
Post: #11
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
"Good writers borrow from other writers. Great writers steal from them outright."

Or, to make this into a self-demonstrating quote:

To be a good writer you have to be a bad neighbor; rather than asking to use your neighbor;s hedge clippers, you should break into his shed overnight and be willing to stab someone with them if caught.

It's not the funniest way to word it, I'll admit, but it gets the point across.

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"Every man's heart one day beats its final beat, his lungs breath their final breath. And if what that man did in his life, makes the blood pulse through the body of others, and makes them believe deeper in something larger than life, then his essence, his spirit, will be immortalized by the storytellers, by the loyalty, by the memory, of those who honor him and make whatever the man did live forever."
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04-18-2012, 09:37 PM
Post: #12
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
I think the main thing to remember when you're "stealing" ideas is that you're not going to be taking them word-for-word and copy-pasting them into your script. A joke can't work in every context or with every character unless it's adjusted accordingly. You need to tweak various joke ideas and tropes to fit your show, and after a bit of experimentation, you can twist different scenarios into completely new outcomes that will come straight out of left-field. But it takes time, and a lot of trial-and-error, in order to learn how to use comedic tropes and ideas. Learning to subvert, invert, play straight, and avert tropes can be challenging, but can give you an entirely new perspective of comedy and writing in general.

But to reiterate, I doubt anyone appreciates it when characters and jokes are entirely ripped from the source and slapped onto your shitty abridged series. The reason why I've come to dislike LK's YuGiOh stuff is because he often does that. The Mooninites as the Battle City tag-team duelists was not a creative "joke steal," it was just the Mooninites using the duelists as mouthpieces. Same with the opening scene with LK's BBT movie. It was just the Aqua Team Hunger Force's opening scene, with the audio cut out directly, and using YuGiOh Abridged's characters as mouthpieces. It isn't funny, to me at least, because nothing is being adjusted. Nothing is being done new. It's the exact same stolen joke, put over your stolen anime footage. It's not creative. It's lazy.

Now, actually learning how to play with tropes, as I said before, is different. It's something I actually encourage many abridgers, new and old, to study up on. I guarantee that whatever character, personality, or scenario you're working with has a trope page waiting for you to read and play around with. So, start studying it up here: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/HomePage

As for anything I'd like to chip in, direction and acting are so important in this kind of community. The most important thing to remember, is to not hold back. If your acting requires you to be loud and yelling a lot, then go for it. If you need to go crazy with it, then go on ahead. I think this contributes a lot to LordMoonstone's success as a comedian, as he isn't afraid to give it his all in recording lines. Pokemon Bridged's episode 05 benefited so much from his energy, I still consider it one of my favorite episodes to this day. Energy and overacting can really spice up your video, and make a boring script exciting and hilarious. All it takes is a few hours by yourself, a good bit of water, and your mic settings turned down low.

And that's my thoughts, nerds.

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04-19-2012, 12:46 AM (This post was last modified: 04-19-2012 12:46 AM by Innagadadavida.)
Post: #13
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
There we go. i updated and finished the guide. I would like to request a sticky. Because I put a lot of thought into this and I think it can be used for good. Also I want recognition. I crave it like a baby platypus craves milk from the pools in the mother platypus's abdomen, as a platypus lacks a functioning mammary gland thus excretes the fluid from pores in its skin.
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04-19-2012, 09:28 AM (This post was last modified: 04-19-2012 09:30 AM by WTSRemix.)
Post: #14
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
(04-18-2012 05:21 PM)Innagadadavida Wrote:  Here's a dirty secret. Over the years, WeeklyTubeShow has stolen quite a few jokes outright. umad?

Dammit, Inna'.

I just wanna point out to everyone that anything I parroted from anybody else was either something obviously well-known or from somebody I told. I know Inna' might have clarified what he meant by this, but FFFFFFFFFFFF
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04-19-2012, 01:45 PM
Post: #15
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
Way to ruin my point by acting embarrassed. I'll spew diarrhea on your house. sorry about the diarrhea comment.

Yes. It is often pointed out in the description of the videos which jokes were stolen and where.
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04-20-2012, 05:40 AM
Post: #16
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
I need a gimmick. Does sprinkling scores made by Ennio Morricone through out your series count as a gimmick?

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04-20-2012, 08:55 AM
Post: #17
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
Music is all too often treated as something you slap on afterwards to fill up space. Many series I see don't understand how music relates to an image, so you end up with cues the that just react poorly and arbitrarily to what's going on on the screen. If the spirit Ennio's music invokes fits with the spirit and character of your show and offers something to the viewer, then that's what matters. If you're slapping it on just to have it there then I figure that's not the right way of going about it.
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04-20-2012, 06:49 PM
Post: #18
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
Get me the f*ck out of this bubble, Garlic Jr.
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04-21-2012, 04:51 PM
Post: #19
RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
(04-20-2012 05:40 AM)OoziHobo Wrote:  I need a gimmick. Does sprinkling scores made by Ennio Morricone through out your series count as a gimmick?

I think in your case it does. The music at least fits the show, unlike most I've seen. The score works as a reference at the very least

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04-22-2012, 07:19 AM
Post: #20
Photo RE: The Principles of a Good Abridged Show
(04-20-2012 06:49 PM)WTSRemix Wrote:  Get me the f*ck out of this bubble, Garlic Jr.

The good old days.
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